6 Photography Tips for Shooting Interiors Like a Pro

6 Photography Tips for Shooting Interiors Like a ProI was recently invited to do the photo shoot for a freshly renovated restaurant. The 80s-inspired diner has an interesting vintage design. The designer and its contractor did a perfect job. The unique and intricate detailing left me awe-struck. I wonder what tools they used for this project, I’m sure they must’ve used a reciprocating saw (much like the ones found at this website) for achieving with precision, the odd-shaped wooden custom details. With such an impeccably designed space, I’m sure I can take some incredible stills.

Having done a number of interior photography projects for different clients (mostly in the interior design and real estate industry), I understand just how important excellent interior photography is for businesses. And regardless of the industry you’re business is in (such as interior design, hospitality, restaurant, healthcare, corporate,) gorgeous photographs of indoor spaces are essential in your marketing efforts. They catch the attention of audiences and entice them to choose your service.

For freelance photographers out there, here I’ve compiled a number of tips learned from some pro photographers:

  1. Picking the best perspective

Indoor spaces will look differently when viewed from a different corner. Make sure step back, try taking stills from all corners, and see which perspective captures the indoor space at its best.

  1. Use proper lighting

You want the photo to look balanced without under-lit or over-lit spots. As much as possible, you want to use available lighting to make the photos look more genuine. Maximize the natural soft light that enters from the window. It is best to shoot late afternoon or early morning.

This video explains a little more:

  1. Wide shot

A wide angle shot allows you to capture as much of the space. To achieve a wide shot, you may need to use a lens anywhere from 16mm to 24mm. However, avoid going too wide as it can also distort the perspective.

  1. Avoid blurring

Your indoor photos must look sharp and free of blurring. Use a tripod or other stabilizing measure to make sure that the shot is untainted by any unwanted movements.

  1. Stage the space, but not too much

Make sure the photos make the indoor space look organized. If you want the space to have a certain vibe, you may need to add accessories or details. You may also need to rearrange furniture or move them around. Of course, you have to remove clutter. If the space is just newly renovated, make sure to take out unwanted items; any power tool such as a cordless reciprocating saw is included.

  1. Be versatile

Photography TipsEvery indoor space will have its unique features as well as unique purpose. Be creative and be ready to experiment. With every shoot, be mindful about what the photo is meant for or what it “sells”.

Most important of all, keep taking photos – more than you think you need. You’ll appreciate having plenty of options to choose from later on.